How to Gain Strength with Reverse Pyramid Training

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How to Gain Strength with Reverse Pyramid Training

It seems like every day, a new training protocol or program sees the light of day. There are so many styles of training out there that most of us end up spending more time and effort trying to figure out how to train than we do actually.. you know.. training.

Everywhere you look, there’s someone who’s trying to shove their ‘superior’ way of training down your throat. And the bad news?

Most of the protocols/programs out there have major issues. They are often very complicated, very demanding, and short-term. Not to mention the countless programs that are pure garbage. But I digress.

Today, we’ll take a look at an old, simple and effective training style that has proven itself over and over again – reverse pyramid training.

What is Reverse Pyramid Training and What’s the Logic Behind It?

For the sake of simplicity (and my wish to avoid boring you to death), I’ll try to keep it simple. Reverse pyramid training is a style of training where you start off your workouts with heavier and more demanding sets while you are still fresh. As the workout progresses, you gradually decrease the weight you use in favor of doing more repetitions.

So, here’s an example if you were to do your first exercise of the day in an RPT fashion:

2-4 warm-up sets, working up to your training weight

Set 1: weight you can lift for 4-8 repetitions

Set 2: take 10% off top set, do extra reps

Set 3: take 10% off set #2, do extra reps

Example:

2-4 warm-up sets, working up to 375 pounds on the deadlift

Set 1: 375 pounds for 5 repetitions

Set 2: 335 pounds for 6-7 repetitions

Set 3: 305 pounds for 8-9 repetitions

Treat your warm-up as you normally do. Do a few progressively heavier sets for a few simple repetitions and don’t put too much effort in them. The goal is to work your way up to the working weight, not tire yourself by the time you start your top set.

Now, anecdotally, this style of training makes a lot of sense. You are fresh and recovered at the beginning of your workouts, which means that you can put a lot of effort into the first few sets of your workouts and, by extension, force a greater response from your body (building strength).

reverse pyramid training to gain strength

How to Train RPT Style

Part of the reason why I love reverse pyramid training is that it’s very easy to understand and simple to get started.

  1. Do a few warm-up sets, slowly working your way up to 75-85% of your top set weight.
  2. Load the weight for your top set. For the deadlift or trap bar deadlift, it’s usually a weight you can lift for 3-6 repetitions. For any other compound movement (bench, squat, row, press, pull-up, etc.) a bit higher (6-8 repetitions) is advised.
  3. Decrease the weight by 10%, rest up, and do the second set, aiming to do 1-2 more repetitions.
  4. Decrease the weight by 10% more, rest up, and do the final set, aiming for 1-2 extra repetitions.
  5. Continue to the next exercise.

You should put a lot of effort into each set and do as many repetitions as you can without reaching failure. If you start cutting the range of motion short or your technique breaks down, stop the set. This is your maximum.

That’s the essence of RPT training in action. Once you understand that, you can apply reverse pyramid training in many different ways to your training.

You can do it for the sets of a given exercise as we discussed above, but you can also do it on an exercise-to-exercise basis:

Exercise 1 (e.g., deadlift): 4 sets of 4-8 repetitions

Exercise 2 (e.g., barbell row): 4 sets of 6-10 repetitions

Exercise 3 (e.g., lat pulldown): 3 sets of 8-12 repetitions

Exercise 4 (e.g., seated cable row): 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions

As you see, we are still gradually lowering the weight and increasing the repetitions as we progress into our workout and you get more fatigued. The only difference is that we are doing it on a larger scale.

You can also implement this style for each exercise and work your way ‘down,’ but understand that this style of training is very demanding and your risk of overtraining or injuring yourself would be much higher.

Here’s an example:

Exercise 1 (bench press): set 1 – 6 to 8 repetitions set 2 (drop weight by 10%) – 8 to 10 repetitions set 3 (drop weight by another 10%) 10-12 repetitions

Exercise 2 (incline press): set 1 – 6 to 8 repetitions set 2 (drop weight by 10%) – 8 to 10 repetitions set 3 (drop weight by another 10%) 10-12 repetitions

Exercise 3 (machine chest press): set 1 – 6 to 8 repetitions set 2 (drop weight by 10%) – 8 to 10 repetitions set 3 (drop weight by another 10%) 10-12 repetitions

Etc., etc.

Again, I don’t recommend this, because it’s highly demanding. For your latter sets, I recommend either going for straight sets (e.g., 3 sets x 10-15 reps) or using RPT in the context of the entire workout (i.e., gradually lowering the weight overall in favor of more repetitions done).

How you choose to implement RPT is up to you, but understand that you should use it on a set-to-set basis only for compound movements, preferably in the beginning of your workout. After that, the accessory work should be done with lighter weights for more repetitions (8+).

To avoid injury, its important to have good form on your deadlift.  Please watch this short video on deadlift form.

How to Gain Strength With Reverse Pyramid Training

How good a training protocol or program is can be largely determined by its progression style. Many programs out there don’t employ any style of progression on a weekly or monthly basis, yet people wonder why they’re not getting any decent results from their 20-set workouts.

Here’s the deal:

If you want to see improvement in your body and performance continuously, you need to be doing MORE as time passes. This is what training means. If you’re doing the same stuff over and over again, you are simply exercising and maintaining your current results. You’re also not getting stronger or more muscular.

This is why progressive overload is a key requirement and, as a natural lifter, getting stronger is the most reliable and efficient way to get more muscular.

Now, reverse pyramid training uses a double progression system. This means that your goal should be to increase the weight you’re lifting, the repetitions you’re doing, or, if you’re having a particularly good day, both (on a weekly basis).

Here’s how:

  1. For the first week or two, you’ll need to guess your starting weights so that your near-failure sets fall into the prescribed rep ranges.

For example, if you start with 120 kilos (265 lbs.) on the squat and get 8 easy reps on your top set, you should start with 125 kilos (275 lbs.) the following week. On the other hand, if you don’t manage to get at least 6 reps with 120 kilos, start the following week with 115 kilos (255 lbs.) and go from there.

  1.  Once you’ve got your starting numbers, set goals for each exercise. For example, on the squat, place goals for 8 repetitions (top set), 10 repetitions (second set), and 12 repetitions (third set). Once you reach your goal repetitions with a given weight, you’re eligible for an increase in the following week.

For example:

Week 1

Goals: 8, 10, 12

Set 1: 100 kg x 8

Set 2: 90 kg x 10

Set 3: 80 kg x 12

You’ve cleared all three goals and can increase the load for all three sets.

Week 2

Goals: 8, 10, 12

Set 1: 102.5 kg x 6

Set 2: 92.5 kg x 9

Set 3: 82.5 kg x 12

This week, you’ve only cleared your 12-rep goal so next week up that to 85 kilos while keeping sets 1 and 2 the same. You’ll increase the weight there once you clear your goals.

This, I feel, is the most engaging and rewarding progression style because even if your top set sucks, you still have a chance to ‘earn’ your right to lift heavier weights for sets 2 and 3 in the following week (if you reach your goals, of course).

You can also increase the weight across all sets once you clear all goals, but be prepared to lift the same weights for a few weeks in a row. With the independent style I outlined above, you get to add weight where you can while working your way up to reach your three individual goals.

You can also do it in linear progression style where each week you add +2.5 kilos (5 lbs.) to the bar. The problem is, nobody past the beginner stage will make such sweet, smooth gains on a weekly basis and you’ll eventually reach a point where your top set is a 2-3 repetition grinder (or an upright row max for your spotter). The perfect way to get yourself injured.

improving squat with reverse pyramid training

What I Like (adore is more accurate) about Reverse Pyramid Training

It’s the perfect way to maintain and increase your strength during fat loss

I’ve tried many different methods of training during fat loss for myself and clients, and I’ve found RPT to be the most effective way to get stronger and maintain muscle mass. The reason being, this is a low-volume, high-intensity style of training, perfectly suited for periods of caloric restriction.

It’s simple to follow, and there’s very little math involved

As far as simplicity goes, you can’t go wrong with RPT. It takes effort and basics to get you the desired results. Okay, and a bit of math.

You can make sweet gains with fewer training days and less training volume

Because reverse pyramid training is quite intense, you can’t (and shouldn’t) train with very high volumes or frequencies. But, you can make amazing progress with both your strength and muscle mass on as few as three workouts per week.

When you’re done with this one, check out this related article: How Often Should I Lift Weights to Gain Muscle?

It satisfies your ego and cravings for heavy weight

Let’s face it: we all like pushing heavy weights because it just tickles the ego like nothing else. With RPT, your focus is to lift heavy weights close to failure, but safely and intelligently.

What I Dislike About Revers Pyramid Training

It can get stale after a while

Yes, despite the (mostly) predictable progress, RPT can get stale after a while. Also, some guys tend to gravitate towards high frequency and high volume and feel like lazy slobs on reverse pyramid training.

Linear progression isn’t always predictable which can be frustrating

Yes, progressive overload tends to come in waves. On some days, you feel great, and weights just lift themselves. Other times, you feel like a boiled turd, and you may even have to use lighter weights to stay in the prescribed repetition range.

It can be mentally exhausting for some people

I know what you’re thinking:

“Doing 3 heavy sets is mentally exhausting? What the hell?”

Yes, but realize that those 3 sets (or more, if you follow RPT on multiple exercises), are tough. And when I say tough, I mean it. After a top set on the deadlift or squat, you’ll be winded, you’ll be exhausted, and you’ll need at least 4-5 minutes to recover.

Some guys explode with this type of training and thrive on it. For others, however, moderate intensities of effort work better.

But you need to try it out before coming to conclusions. (Well, unless you’re already getting stressed out and tired just by reading this. In this case, RPT is not for you.)

It’s not suited for beginners

Beginners need to spend their time learning good technique well within their physical limits. Having someone with a few weeks under the bar do RPT is downright dangerous because they haven’t established the proper motor patterns yet and can’t tell when their form goes down the crapper.

People can get wrapped up too much into the progression and disregard common sense and technique

This can tie in with the previous drawback, but intermediate and advanced lifters can also get wrapped up into the progression and forget that their once perfect deadlift technique now resembles a scared cat.

Because of that, always keep proper form and a full range of motion. Only then can you add more weight to the bar safely.

The Bottom Line

Reverse pyramid training is a very effective and simplistic approach to getting stronger. It can be used during periods of muscle growth, but also if your goal is fat loss.

It’s very result-oriented, and you’re forced to think about your progression every week thanks to the goals that you set.

There are some drawbacks to this style of training, but as long as you keep them in mind, apply yourself and don’t do anything stupid, you can make some great progress with this style.

Featured image Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash

2018-08-27T10:24:10-07:00August 27th, 2018|

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